Downloadable Press Kit

Photo credit: Francesca Myman/Locus Publications. A link to www.locusmag.com is appreciated but not required. Free for noncommercial use. Contact Liza at locus@locusmag.com prior to any commercial use, as there may be associated charges.
Photo credit: Francesca Myman/Locus Publications. A link to www.locusmag.com is appreciated but not required. Free for noncommercial use. Contact Liza at locus@locusmag.com prior to any commercial use, as there may be associated charges.
Permission is granted to freely use the following photograph for promotional or press purposes so long as it is credited © 2008 Adam Rakunas.
Permission is granted to freely use the following photograph for promotional or press purposes so long as it is credited © 2008 Adam Rakunas.

25 Words

Adam Rakunas is the author of the Philip K. Dick Award-nominated WINDSWEPT and its sequel LIKE A BOSS. Find him online at giro.org.

50 Words

Adam Rakunas is the author of the Philip K. Dick Award-nominated WINDSWEPT and its sequel LIKE A BOSS. He has worked as a video game engineer, a triathlon race director, and a parking lot attendant. He lives in the Pacific Northwest. Find him online at giro.org.

100 Words

Adam Rakunas is the author of the Philip K. Dick Award-nominated WINDSWEPT and its sequel LIKE A BOSS. His short fiction has appeared in Futurismic.com and the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. He has had a long and varied career as a video game engineer, a triathlon race director, a parking lot attendant, an IT consultant, and a theater usher. He splits his copious spare time between writing, political rabble-rousing, and being a stay-at-home dad. A former Southern Californian, he and his family now live in the Pacific Northwest. Find him online at giro.org.

150 Words

Adam Rakunas is the author of the Philip K. Dick Award-nominated WINDSWEPT and its sequel LIKE A BOSS, both from Angry Robot Books. His short fiction has appeared in Futurismic.com and the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Mark Teppo has called his work, “Something that is one part Karl Marx proletariat politics and one part Hemingwayesque rum-soaked conspiracy theories, soaking in a brine of well-cured Iain M. Banks space opera. With just a dash of Things Blowing Up for a spicy kick.”

He has a long and varied career as a video game engineer, a triathlon race director, a parking lot attendant, an IT consultant, and a theater usher. He splits his copious spare time between writing, political rabble-rousing, and being a stay-at-home dad. A former Southern Californian, he and his family now live in the Pacific Northwest. Find him online at giro.org or on Twitter @rakdaddy.

Long Form Bio

Adam Rakunas grew up in Orange County, California, playing with Star Wars action figures, riding dirt bikes, and puzzling over Infocom text adventures. His schooling (public and Catholic) inspired his first published short story, “The Right People,” which appeared on Futurismic.com.

Adam attended Harvey Mudd College, where he encountered the works of Robert Heinlein and his own inadequacies as a science student. He transferred to Cal Poly Pomona, where he spent his free time mountain biking, writing awful poetry, and pouring through the collected works of Kurt Vonnegut, Neil Gaiman, and Alan Moore. Just before squeaking out with a BS in physics, Adam had a chance encounter with the president of a video game company that lead to an illustrious and sedentary career as a software engineer.

During a fire drill, Adam borrowed a friend’s copy of Stephen King’s “On Writing.” Despite being a life-long reader, he had never known about the basics of the business of writing. He wrote a Valentine’s Day story about a magical version of Los Angeles, which earned him the first of many rejection slips.

Adam met Anne Thompson at a gathering for their triathlon club. After bonding over Monty Python and Doctor Who, they got married in 2004, just in time for both of them to be broke and unemployed.

Adam joined a friend’s writing group, which lead to getting hired by an advertising firm run by one his fellow members. When he wasn’t exploring the rich frontiers of online marketing, social media, and virtual worlds, he wrote during his lunch breaks until, one day, he realized his true calling in life: not having to work with clients ever, ever again. Fortunately, the global economy agreed and subsequently collapsed, thus allowing Adam the time he needed to complete his first novel, “Windswept,” a gonzo noir about sex, violence, and labor relations.

In late 2009, Anne and Adam adopted a baby girl, and Adam became a stay-at-home dad, certain he’d be able to write during their daughter’s naps. (Parents, you may begin laughing now.) Two years and countless diapers later, Adam joined another writing group, the Freeway Dragons. Thanks to the Dragons’ input, he rewrote and sold “Oh Give Me A Home” to the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, eleven years after his first rejection from that same publication.

“Windswept” was published by Angry Robot Books in September 2015. It was nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award in 2016. World Fantasy Award winner Daryl Gregory described “Windswept” as “a zippy, zany ride, with more fast turns than a Wild Mouse rollercoaster.”

The sequel, the improbably titled “Like A Boss,” was published in June 2016. Nebula Award-nominated author Ted Kosmatka calls it “a masterwork of big ideas, perfectly executed.”

Adam Rakunas and his family now live in the Pacific Northwest, surrounded by trees and lots of water.